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Dassault launch Falcon 6X as a replacement for the X5

Dassault has launched the $47 million Falcon 6X, as the replacement for the Falcon 5X that the company was obliged to cancel last year.

The Falcon 5X was officially canceled in December 2017 following continuing issues with the Snecma Silvercrest engines that were due to have powered it.

The Falcon 6X will instead use Pratt & Whitney Canada PW812D series engines, each capable of producing between 13,000 – 14,000lb of thrust.

Swapping to PW812D engines means that the aircraft will also be more fuel efficient than its abandoned predecessor, as well as being able to fly further. The Falcon 5X was projected to have a range of 5,200nm, but the Falcon 6X will be able to fly 5,500nm.

The cross-section from the 5X is reused but has been stretched by 20 inches. The structure of the wing has also been completely redesigned, with a new structural aerodynamics.


As with most other Falcon aircraft, the 6X will be able to use steep approach paths and short runways, including those at Aspen and London City airports.


Falcon 6X—Industry Leading Cabin Space

The Falcon 6X cabin is six feet, six inches (1.98 m) high and 8 feet 6 inches (2.58 m) wide — the highest and widest cross section in a purpose built business jet – and is nearly 40 feet 8 inches (12.3 m) long. The cabin can accommodate 16 passengers in three distinct lounge areas, affording room for multiple configurations including a large entry way/crew rest area and a spacious rear lounge.

Every element of cabin style and design has been totally rethought, the result of an extensive survey of customer tastes and inputs from Dassault Aviation’s own in-house Design Studio. Flowing uninterrupted lines enhance the feeling of space and declutter the cabin.
Significantly more […]

By |February 28th, 2018|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

HondaJet: Buyer’s and Investor’s Guide

HondaJet: Buyer’s and Investor’s Guide

What is it?

To say that the HondaJet has been one of the mostly closely followed business jet developments in history is something of an understatement. It is also not to everybody’s taste.

It does stand out, though, as it is currently the only business jet that has its engines mounted above its wings.

This makes it look different and, while looks are not the main reason why people buy aircraft, it is refreshing to see an aircraft that does not look like every other business jet.

But Honda Aircraft did not design the aircraft to look different, as there are several advantages to having this engine configuration. The most important one is that it reduces drag on the leading edge of the wings, which has the dual advantage of letting the aircraft fly faster while burning less fuel.

As a result, the HondaJet is one of the fastest aircraft in its class.

It is also one of the most comfortable in its class, although, being a very light jet, it is not designed to fly long distances.


You do not buy a very light jet and expect to be able to party on it, or to sleep as you cross oceans. You expect to get a functional cabin that is comfortable for journeys of several hours or less.

But the cabin of the HondaJet is one of the selling features. Step inside and you will be forgiven for thinking you are in a much larger aircraft.

Honda Aircraft has borrowed from its parent company’s knowledge of car interiors and come up with a refreshingly fresh interior. The standard configuration is for two forward-facing club seats, two rear seats – with very good leg room – and a single divan […]

By |January 4th, 2018|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Global 7000 On Track, Questions Remain on Global 8000

Recent comments from Bombardier executives portray a clouded future for the company’s Global 8000. Compounding this uncertainty is a still-undefined certification schedule, an apparent paucity of orders, and, according to industry analyst Rollie Vincent, “unclear” market requirements. (Photo: Bombardier Aerospace)

While Bombardier remains on track to certify and deliver the first Global 7000s later this year, recent comments from company executives portray a clouded future for its truncated, longer-legged sibling—the Global 8000. Compounding this uncertainty is a still-undefined certification schedule, an apparent paucity of orders, and, according to industry analyst Rollie Vincent, “unclear” market requirements.

During an investor day late last month, Bombardier Business Aircraft president David Coleal said the Global 8000 accounts for “a very, very small percentage of our backlog,” implying that demand is lukewarm for a variant that trades nearly eight feet of cabin space for an extra 600 nm of range, to 7,900 nm. He avoided any kind of concrete schedule for the new jet, saying the Canadian aircraft manufacturer will “determine the right schedule for the 8000…probably sometime after” the Global 7000 enters service.

Coleal also touched on the fact that the models might not have enough differentiation in the marketplace. “We’re also going to look very closely at the performance of the 7000 in determination with the 8000 and understand the differences between the two.” Recent remarks by Bombardier president and CEO Alain Bellemare that there has been an “overinvestment in aerospace” over the past few years cast doubt on whether the company would even invest more to differentiate the Global 8000 from the 7000.

“My thought is that the Global 8000 is no longer on their radar, per se,” said Vincent, the managing director at JetNet iQ. “I believe that they will […]

By |January 4th, 2018|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Pilatus PC-24 Certificates

Pilatus obtains PC-24 Type Certificates

Pilatus has obtained type certificates from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the US-American Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the first ever Swiss business jet.
Certification of the Super Versatile Jet prepares the ground for initial customer deliveries, which will see the PC-24 business jet take off from Central Switzerland for its entry on the global market.

In any project to develop a new aircraft, certification by the aviation authorities is by far the most important milestone, given that it means deliveries to customers may go ahead, generating revenue for the manufacturer. The PC-24 development project was officially announced in 2013, but work on the Super Versatile Jet has in fact been in progress for the past eleven and a half years

Complex project with a tight schedul

The first PC-24 prototype completed its maiden flight in May 2015. All three prototypes used in the certification programme have flown a total of 2205 hours worldwide so far. Some flight tests were conducted in extreme environments: in icing conditions and very hot temperatures, at altitudes and speeds not usually encountered in everyday operations. Other tests have included bird impacts, structural stress tests, noise tests and general function. All this to prove that customers may depend on this aircraft to operate safely and reliably at all times, in line with statutory requirements. In fact, Pilatus test pilots took the aircraft to the very boundaries of its limits and even beyond, flying it in configurations and maneuvers forbidden to the commercial pilots who will subsequently occupy the cockpit.

Oscar J. Schwenk, Chairman at Pilatus, said: “The PC-24 is the first ever Pilatus business jet. Naturally, the requirements associated with obtaining certification for this sort of aircraft are extremely […]

By |December 25th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Aviation Tax Reform Issues

NBAA Members Urged to Contact Congress on Aviation Tax Reform Issues

As the highly publicized aviation tax reform legislation moves forward in Washington, DC, NBAA continues its advocacy work, and urges association members to contact Congress on aviation-related issues included in the larger aviation tax reform bills.

Three issues impacting business aviation are in question:

Immediate expensing
Like-kind exchanges
Taxes applicable to aircraft management companies

The House and the Senate have taken slightly different approaches on dealing with bonus depreciation. Both bills contain provisions regarding depreciation of business assets (including aircraft), which allow 100 percent immediate expensing, or bonus depreciation, for property used in business, if that property is placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2023.

In the House bill, both new and pre-owned equipment qualify for immediate expensing. However, the Senate bill allows immediate expensing only for new equipment; pre-owned equipment does not qualify for bonus depreciation. Immediate expensing expires in the House bill on Jan. 1, 2023, while the Senate language allows immediate expensing to continue after 2023, with annual phase downs until 2027.

Both bills repeal like-kind exchanges for business assets, including aircraft. Currently, like-kind exchanges allow property used in business to be exchanged for a similar business asset while deferring any taxable gain on the sale.

“The immediate expensing provision helps make up for the like-kind exchange repeal, but there is, of course, a sunset date for immediate expensing,” said Scott O’Brien, NBAA’s senior director of government affairs. “But the Senate language, which does not allow immediate expensing for pre-owned equipment, is a disincentive for the purchase of pre-owned business aircraft.”

NBAA has been an active member of the Like-Kind Exchange Coalition for a number of years, working alongside equipment manufacturers/dealers and car […]

By |December 25th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Supersonic boost

Supersonic boost as Aerion links with Lockheed Martin
Two leaders in supersonic technology, Aerion and Lockheed Martin have announced an MOU to explore the feasibility of a joint development of the world’s first supersonic business jet, the Aerion AS2. Over the next 12 months, the companies will work together to develop a framework on all phases of the programme, including engineering, certification and production.

Aerion Chairman Robert Bass said: “This relationship is absolutely key to creating a supersonic renaissance. When it comes to supersonic know-how, Lockheed Martin’s capabilities are well known, and, in fact, legendary. We share with Lockheed Martin a commitment to the long-term development of efficient civil supersonic aircraft.”

Lockheed Martin, known for developing the world’s leading supersonic combat aircraft, the F-16, the F-35, and F-22, as well as the Mach 3+ SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft, is committed to fostering new innovations and developing supersonic technologies with civil and commercial applications.
“We are excited to work with Aerion on their development of the next-generation, efficient supersonic jet that will potentially serve as a platform for pioneering future supersonic aircraft,” said Orlando Carvalho, executive vice president, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics.
The MOU is the result of extensive discussions between Aerion and Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works® Advanced Development Programs team. For close to 75 years, Skunk Works has existed to create revolutionary aircraft that push the boundaries of what is possible.

“Following our initial review of Aerion’s aerodynamic technology, our conclusion is that the Aerion AS2 concept warrants the further investment of our time and resources,” said Carvalho. “We are committed to remaining on the cutting edge of aerospace technology and are excited to examine the contribution we might make to working with Aerion on making aviation history.”

During the last two and a […]

By |December 25th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Bird Aerosystems Announces Private Jet Anti-missile Protection Pod

The Bird Aerosystems Aeroshield missile-defense pod for civil aircraft incorporates sensors and can dispense flares. Photo: Bird Aerosystems.

Israel-based Bird Aerosystems has announced the availability of its latest anti-missile defense pod for Private Jet, designed for airliners and bizliners, the latter including the Airbus ACJ320 and Boeing BBJ. To help counter what it said is a growing threat of man-portable air defense systems (manpads), the company’s Aeroshield pod incorporates five sensors that detect when an air-to-air or surface-to-air missile has been launched. It also has one sensor that can detect when a missile is approaching, as well as two-to-four flare dispensers (to divert heat-seeking missiles) and an inertial measurement unit.

Bird Aerospace claims that its Aeroshield is the only Private Jet Anti-missile Protection Pod available that both supports flare protection and complies with EASA and FAA civil aviation regulations. The company said several of the Private Jet Anti-missile Protection Pods are already in service with unidentified customers.

The company also noted that the small-footprint Private Jet Anti-missile Protection Pod is easily installed, can be readily transferred from aircraft to aircraft and provides effective protection “with minimal interference to the aircraft.” Besides airborne missile protection systems, Bird Aerosystems also specializes in airborne surveillance, information and observation equipment.

 Israel has successfully completed a series of tests of an anti-missile defense system for passenger jets, the system’s manufacturer and Israel’s Defense Ministry announced.Elbit System’s C-Music system – whose Hebrew name translates to “Sky Shield” – is designed to protect commercial airliners against shoulder-fired missiles.

Israel’s Army Radio reported that several Israeli passenger planes have already been outfitted with the gear.

These photos from the Defense Ministry and Elbit Systems show the system installed under passenger aircraft:Elbit’s C-Music anti-missile system installed on the underbelly of […]

By |February 18th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

First Global 7000 Logs 100 Hours; FTV2 To Fly Soon

The New Bombardier Global 7000 Logs 100 Hours; FTV2 To Fly Soon

The first Bombardier Global 7000 flight test vehicle, FTV1, has now amassed more than 100 hours of flying. FTV2 will soon join the flight-test fleet as the program moves toward certification and entry into service in the second half of 2018. (Photo: Bombardier Aerospace)

 Bombardier Aerospace’s Global 7000 program is “progressing” solidly, with the sole flight-test vehicle, FTV1, having completed more than 100 hours of flight testing to date, the Canadian aircraft manufacturer announced today. FTV2 is also now complete and has been moved to its dedicated pre-flight bay ahead of its first flight, which is expected “shortly.” for the Global 7000.

Global 7000FTV1 “is showing a high level of maturity, demonstrating that we have captured the lessons learned from the C Series program,” Alain Bellemare, president and CEO of parent company Bombardier, said this morning during a financial earnings conference call. Both the C Series and the Global 7000, as well as its Global 8000 sibling, employ fly-by-wire control systems.

Meanwhile, Bellemare said that the production wing for the Global 7000 is now in final design and expected to be flying on a production-conforming airplane later this year. Bombardier cited issues related to the Global 7000 wing as a factor in its decision for a two-year program delay, and in late December, wing supplier Triumph filed suit against Bombardier over wing development costs.

The Global 7000 remains on track for entry into service in the second half of next year, Bellemare noted. A company spokeswoman told AIN that the follow-on Global 8000 “continues to be part of our development program,” adding that its schedule will be released “later on” in the Global 7000 flight-test program.

Click here on […]

By |February 18th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Private Jet Security and International Ground Transportation

Private Jet Security Experts Offer Three Considerations for International Ground Transportation
Ensuring the safety of passengers and crew doesn’t end when an aircraft reaches its destination. All parties must then be delivered securely to their final stop – a task that can be more challenging when traveling outside of the United States for Private Jets.

Matt Burdette, chief of intelligence with UnitedHealthcare Global Risk, identified the main factors to consider when selecting ground transportation for Private Jets options:

Consideration 1: Location Matters for Private Jets
Operators should assess if there are threat-pattern trends at their destination. Security that’s appropriate in certain international destinations may vary drastically from the requirements in more volatile locations.

“A trip in London is one thing, as opposed to Mexico City, in determining what transportation you choose,” said Burdette.
In locations with prominent levels of risk for Private Jets, Burdette recommended scaling the security capability to deal with potential threats. “You may consider using a driver with security operations training including escape and evasion, offensive and defensive driving and knowing how to handle a vehicle under extreme situations,” he said.

Consideration 2: Arrange Transportation with a Trusted Provider of Private Jets
Burdette said there is one central question operators need to ask when procuring transportation: is it a known, trusted provider?

“Is it a provider whom you’ve retained access through a trustworthy source for Private Jets or vetted yourself?” he said. “You’re looking for somebody who provides that level of service that you’re after, which more than anything else is safety and security, and secondly is timeliness and reliability.”

Sarah Wolf, NBAA’s senior manager for security and facilitation, recommended procuring the same level of security for both crew and passengers of Private Jets, as crew members are the most essential resource in situations where […]

By |February 18th, 2017|Categories: Aircharter News|0 Comments

Pilatus PC-24

The Pilatus PC-24 is a twin-engine business jet
developed by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland.

The Super Versatile Jet
A Class of its own.
Every crystal found in the mountains of Switzerland is entirely unique. Just as unique is the Pilatus PC-24, the only aircraft combining the versatility of a turboprop with the cabin size of a medium-light jet, and the performance of a light jet. It’s a plane that simply doesn’t fit into any of the existing business jet categories.

That’s why they had to create a new one: the Super Versatile Jet (SVJ) category. The Pilatus PC-24 has been engineered to be “off-road“ compatible from the beginning. Its outstanding short-field performance – even on unpaved runways – opens up an incredible level of mobility. With the Pilatus PC-24, you will have access to almost 100% more airports around the world.

That means you can fly closer to your final destination than with any other business jet. You‘ll be able to use smaller airports and avoid massive administrative procedures, and reduce ground transfer time to an absolute minimum.

PlaneSense will introduce a new shared jet ownership program when it takes delivery of the first Pilatus Pilatus PC-24 in 2017.

The company has been a long term user of the Pilatus PC-12 turboprop.

The PlaneSense program is scheduled to receive the first Pilatus PC-24 production model in late 2017, and it has already signed for five more to be acquired thereafter.
“Offering a comprehensive fractional jet program with choices of aircraft type to ‘match the mission’ is a natural evolution for the PlaneSense program, and more importantly, it is an expansion that our clients enthusiastically support.”

George Antoniadis, president and CEO of PlaneSense said: “Offering a comprehensive fractional jet program with choices of aircraft type to ‘match the […]

By |December 25th, 2016|Categories: Aircraft|0 Comments